RESIDENT HOPES JAZZ SHOW CALMS CAPITOLA VILLAGE
By Soraya Gutierrez, Santa Cruz Sentinel
August 13, 2005

The condo Peter Dwares built for himself overlooking the Esplanade sits empty because he says the loud music from nearby bars is out of hand.

Sunday, he will bring his vision of what the village should sound like on weekends. Two free jazz performances are being presented by the San Francisco businessman and part-time Capitola resident on consecutive Sundays as a gift to the community.

The first concert will feature Jacqui Naylor and the Jacqui Naylor Quartet. Singer Opie Bellas will perform August 21.

“There’s a lot of really loud bars in the village, and we don’t get enough of this kind of music,” Dwares said from his San Francisco office as Frank Sinatra music played in the background.

He says the loud motorcycles, noisy bars and fights are “over the top” and detract from the village experience.

“It should not be allowed any further, period,” he says.

By presenting the jazz concerts, Dwares hopes to send a message that the village “will not be dominated by one or two noisy bars.”

He would like to see a zero-tolerance policy for the “”raucousness” that ties up the city’s already anemic police resources on the weekends.

City Councilman Mike Termini is hosting the August 21 show and says if it goes well, the city may consider making it an annual affair.

The Esplanade has always had bars, but police try to control the rowdiness, Termini said.

“We’re just trying to make it a fun place, not just for tourists but for everyone,” he said.

Peter Howes, general manager of Howes Entertainment, helped Dwares by booking the performers.

“They’re both at the top of their game,” he said.

The concert sets the tone for the kind of events that families, visitors and locals can enjoy, “showcased in a beautiful environment like Capitola,” Howes said.

This is the first year Dwares is presenting the shows, and he hopes it helps restore the city’s character.

In the meantime, he has written to the city manager about the noise issues.

“I can party fine, but there has to be a balance of mutual respect.”